1. I'm no laundry-folding expert (just ask my wife), but if I were folding something other than t-shirts – something like, say, an airbag – I would pay close attention.

    I'm guessing Audi wishes its airbag supplier would do the same.

    The automaker has to recall 17,700 A7 cars because the supplier didn't properly fold the head-curtain airbags. That means they might bind, not properly inflate, and generally do a terrible job at protecting occupants in a car crash.…

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  2. Audi just wants everyone to know that they're promising "no more misconduct" and "full transparency" in regards to the diesel emissions mess.

    "We will continue until the job is done," Chief Executive Rupert Stadler said, promising to make law and ethics Audi's "ultimate benchmark".

    That's nice and all, but do they really have a choice at this point?…

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  3. One way VW and Audi can win back the good graces of US consumers is through their favorite vehicle, the crossover SUV.

    But they're not going to win many fans if those crossovers keep catching on fire due to a fuel pump defect.

    "... Audi is expanding a previous recall involving 2013-2017 Audi Q5 and 2013-2017 Audi Q7 vehicles with fuel pump flanges that can leak gas, leading to the possibility of fires. More than 240,000 vehicles are part of the recall"…

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  4. Airbags keep finding ways to harm us, this time with their strict restrictions on posture.

    Turns out the passenger airbags in the Audi A3 and S3 can deploy incorrectly if you're lounging back or sitting on the edge of your seat.

    The problem only happens during low-speed crashes and can be traced to a software bug.…

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  5. As part of a fraud investigation, German authorities have raided Audi's German HQ in search of evidence related to the diesel emissions scandal.

    "Audi spokesman Moritz Drechsel said that the raids were focused on the company headquarters in Ingolstadt and at its plant in Neckarsulm in the neighboring state of Baden-Wuerttemberg."…

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  6. Volkswagen has released a settlement update

    for 83,000 Audi, Porsche, and VW vehicles with TDI engines. And methinks owners are going to be Scrooge McDuck levels of happy.

    Owners of the 2009-2012 Audi Q7 3.0L diesel will be eligible for buyback offers between $26,000 to $58,000, depending on model year and mileage. Owners will also be given the option to keep their vehicles – if VW can come up with an adequate fix – and still receive up to $15,380 in compensation for their troubles.

    Even previous owners will be eligible for payments ranging from $4,627 to $7,747.…

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