Realted Problems

  1. Cheating Diesel Emissions

    Audi was caught cheating on its diesel emissions with defeat devices. Twice. It started with the widespread dieselgate story for 2.0L 4-cylinder engines and was followed with a lesser known cheat for vehicles with the ZF 8-speed transmiss…

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    We know there's more problems than this. Let us know which one you'd like to see us cover next.

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Related News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Volkswagen has released a settlement update

    for 83,000 Audi, Porsche, and VW vehicles with TDI engines. And methinks owners are going to be Scrooge McDuck levels of happy.

    Owners of the 2009-2012 Audi Q7 3.0L diesel will be eligible for buyback offers between $26,000 to $58,000, depending on model year and mileage. Owners will also be given the option to keep their vehicles – if VW can come up with an adequate fix – and still receive up to $15,380 in compensation for their troubles.

    Even previous owners will be eligible for payments ranging from $4,627 to $7,747.…

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  2. A judge has given VW's diesel settlement preliminary approval

    , which means owners of 2-liter diesel Volkswagen and Audi vehicles are one step closer to the end of this mess.

    "Judge Charles Breyer already gave preliminary approval to the $15 billion settlement that will see about $10 billion go to U.S. car owners and about $5 billion to cover environmental damages. Now the judge says he is inclined to finalize the settlement terms by October 25, 2016, at least for the most part."…

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  3. The Green Mountain State is seeing red.

    "Vermont has turned down Volkswagen's U.S. emissions cheating settlement offer and opted to sue Audi, Porsche and VW for showing a "blatant disregard" for the protection of the state’s natural resources and the health of its residents."…

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  4. A German newspaper says Volkswagen has been cheating again.

    This time using unapproved software on its 3-liter diesels. Oh, wünderbar.

    "The programs are allegedly used to shut off nitrogen oxide emissions controls after 22 minutes, about two minutes longer than the 20 minutes it takes to perform a typical emissions test. If true, emissions regulators would see normal emissions levels on test machines, then after about 22 minutes the emissions levels will shoot up."…

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  5. Hey emission-wagön owners, VW has setup a special website just for you and the whole thing is ... rather complex.

    There are a good amount of details available now, but those could change up until the final settlement. VW promised to have the final calculations automated on VWCourtSettlement.com by the end of the month.…

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  6. The EPA and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) have rejected Volkswagen's plan to fix the 500,000 diesel vehicles that contain defeat devices.

    They also don't buy that VW didn't lie, like the CEO insists.

    "“They [Volkswagen] continued and compounded the lie and when they were caught they tried to deny it. The result is thousands of tons of nitrogen oxide that have harmed the health of Californians. They need to make it right. Today's action is a step in the direction of assuring that will happen." - CARB"

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  7. More VW and Audi emissions recalls will be needed now that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has hit the company with a second notice of Clean Air violations.

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, no seriously --- what the heck were you guys thinking?…

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  8. **Sp

    aking in front of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee, VW USA CEO, Michael Horn, didn't have much good news to share. Horn said he believes each vehicle will require 5 to 10 hours of work to bring the cars legal according to the standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). However, Mr. Horn said it's possible repairs on the cars could cost more than the value of the cars.

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  9. Volkswagen, parent company of Audi, has been caught cheating EPA rules by a team of researchers.

    The company used a "defeat device" to get around EPA emissions standards for air pollution.

    "The EPA says the "defeat device" is sophisticated software on VW cars that detects when the car is going through official emissions testing. When the software recognizes an official test is underway, it turns on full emissions controls to make it appear the emission standards are within the rules. Once the official tests are completed, the emission controls are decreased during normal driving."…

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